SIMBAD references

2021ApJ...917L..34W - Astrophys. J., 917, L34-L34 (2021/August-3)

TOI-942b: a prograde Neptune in a ∼ 60 Myr old multi-transiting system.

WIRTH C.P., ZHOU G., QUINN S.N., MANN A.W., BOUMA L.G., LATHAM D.W., TESKE J.K., WANG S.X., SHECTMAN S.A., BUTLER R.P. and CRANE J.D.

Abstract (from CDS):

Mapping the orbital obliquity distribution of young planets is one avenue toward understanding mechanisms that sculpt the architectures of planetary systems. TOI-942 is a young field star, with an age of ∼60 Myr, hosting a planetary system consisting of two transiting Neptune-sized planets in 4.3 and 10.1 day period orbits. We observed the spectroscopic transits of the inner Neptune TOI-942b to determine its projected orbital obliquity angle. Through two partial transits, we find the planet to be in a prograde orbit, with a projected obliquity angle of | λ| =1–33+41 deg. In addition, incorporating the light curve and the stellar rotation period, we find the true 3D obliquity to be 2–23+27 deg. We explored various sources of uncertainties specific to the spectroscopic transits of planets around young active stars, and showed that our reported obliquity uncertainty fully encompassed these effects. TOI-942b is one of the youngest planets to have its obliquity characterized, and one of even fewer residing in a multi-planet system. The prograde orbital geometry of TOI-942b is in line with systems of similar ages, none of which have yet been identified to be in strongly misaligned orbits.

Abstract Copyright: © 2021. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved.

Journal keyword(s): Planetary system formation - Planetary science - Exoplanet dynamics - Exoplanet systems - Exoplanets - Mini Neptunes

Status at CDS : Large table(s) will be appraised for possible ingestion in VizieR.

Simbad objects: 8

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2022.08.16-05:45:23

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