SIMBAD references

2018ApJ...866..159V - Astrophys. J., 866, 159-159 (2018/October-3)

Dust emission in an accretion-rate-limited sample of z >= 6 quasars.

VENEMANS B.P., DECARLI R., WALTER F., BANADOS E., BERTOLDI F., FAN X., FARINA E.P., MAZZUCCHELLI C., RIECHERS D., RIX H.-W., WANG R. and YANG Y.

Abstract (from CDS):

We present Atacama Large Millimeter Array 1 mm observations of the rest-frame far-infrared (FIR) dust continuum in 27 quasars at redshifts 6.0 <= z < 6.7. We detect FIR emission at >=3σ in all quasar host galaxies with flux densities at ∼1900 GHz in the rest-frame of 0.12 < S_rest,1900 GHz_ < 5.9 mJy, with a median (mean) flux density of 0.88 mJy (1.59 mJy). The implied FIR luminosities range from LFIR = (0.27-13) x 1012 L, with 74% of our quasar hosts having LFIR > 1012 L. The estimated dust masses are Mdust = 107-109 M. If the dust is heated only by star formation, then the star formation rates in the quasar host galaxies are between 50 and 2700 Myr–1. In the framework of the host galaxy-black hole coevolution model a correlation between ongoing black hole growth and star formation in the quasar host galaxy would be expected. However, combined with results from the literature to create a luminosity-limited quasar sample, we do not find a strong correlation between quasar UV luminosity (a proxy for ongoing black hole growth) and FIR luminosity (star formation in the host galaxy). The absence of such a correlation in our data does not necessarily rule out the coevolution model, and could be due to a variety of effects (including different timescales for black hole accretion and FIR emission).

Abstract Copyright: © 2018. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved.

Journal keyword(s): galaxies: high-redshift - galaxies: star formation - galaxies: statistics - quasars: general

Simbad objects: 98

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2023.01.29-14:27:19

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