2010ApJ...718L.145W


Query : 2010ApJ...718L.145W

2010ApJ...718L.145W - Astrophys. J., 718, L145-L149 (2010/August-1)

Hot stars with hot jupiters have high obliquities.

WINN J.N., FABRYCKY D., ALBRECHT S. and JOHNSON J.A.

Abstract (from CDS):

We show that stars with transiting planets for which the stellar obliquity is large are preferentially hot (Teff> 6250 K). This could explain why small obliquities were observed in the earliest measurements, which focused on relatively cool stars drawn from Doppler surveys, as opposed to hotter stars that emerged more recently from transit surveys. The observed trend could be due to differences in planet formation and migration around stars of varying mass. Alternatively, we speculate that hot-Jupiter systems begin with a wide range of obliquities, but the photospheres of cool stars realign with the orbits due to tidal dissipation in their convective zones, while hot stars cannot realign because of their thinner convective zones. This in turn would suggest that hot Jupiters originate from few-body gravitational dynamics and that disk migration plays at most a supporting role.

Abstract Copyright:

Journal keyword(s): planetary systems - planets and satellites: formation - planet-star interactions - stars: rotation

Simbad objects: 28

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Number of rows : 28
N Identifier Otype ICRS (J2000)
RA
ICRS (J2000)
DEC
Mag U Mag B Mag V Mag R Mag I Sp type #ref
1850 - 2022
#notes
1 HD 10069 * 01 37 25.0332798696 -45 40 40.374717456   9.74 9.30     F6IV/V 187 1
2 HD 15082 dS* 02 26 51.0582618096 +37 33 01.736482032   8.41 8.14     kA5hA8mF4 169 1
3 HD 17156 PM* 02 49 44.4871034544 +71 45 11.629235988   8.78 8.16     F9V 156 2
4 BD+57 793 * 04 21 52.7048156328 +57 49 01.889294952   10.27 9.85     F5V 139 2
5 CoRoT-1 * 06 48 19.1723766840 -03 06 07.710745140     13.6 13.44 12.88 G0V 114 2
6 HAT-P-13 * 08 39 31.8072358440 +47 21 07.273799280   11.15 10.42 10.40   G4 123 2
7 HD 80606 PM* 09 22 37.5768032712 +50 36 13.435326684   9.78 9.00     G8V 305 2
8 CD-31 10766 * 13 55 42.7120177608 -32 09 34.616222028   11.396 10.910     F7 61 1
9 BD+22 2716 * 14 33 06.3571702344 +21 53 40.981395876   10.194 9.745     F5V 88 1
10 CD-27 10695 * 15 59 50.9491505016 -28 03 42.312819096   11.83 11.59 11.31 10.92 F4 99 1
11 HD 147506 * 16 20 36.3576063720 +41 02 53.106772488   9.15 8.69     F8V 151 2
12 HD 149026 PM* 16 30 29.6185771608 +38 20 50.308980864   8.75 8.14     G0IV 211 1
13 TYC 2620-648-1 * 17 53 13.0489562760 +37 12 42.586493328   12.112 11.592     F8 43 2
14 BD+35 3293 V* 18 34 31.6252443960 +35 39 41.491899468   11.07 10.63 10.52   F7V 117 1
15 Kepler-8 Ro* 18 45 09.1489991376 +42 27 03.891327156           F6V 98 1
16 V* V672 Lyr V* 19 04 09.8515616256 +36 37 57.446680296   12.35 11.42     K0V 103 1
17 Kepler-1 Er* 19 07 14.0375836512 +49 18 59.091482160   11.85 11.25     G0V 160 2
18 CoRoT-2 * 19 27 06.4944378024 +01 23 01.359897468   13.422 12.568 12.204 11.49 G7V+K9V 229 2
19 CoRoT-3 EB* 19 28 13.2642131544 +00 07 18.613986132   14.199 13.292 13.099 12.54 F3V 70 1
20 BD+47 2846 Er* 19 28 59.3538826128 +47 58 10.217007804   10.97 10.48     F6V 281 2
21 HD 189733 BY* 20 00 43.7129433648 +22 42 39.073143456 9.241 8.578 7.648 7.126 6.68 K2V 805 1
22 WASP-2 V* 20 30 54.1282355304 +06 25 46.341284844   13 11.98     K1.5 124 1
23 HD 209458 V* 22 03 10.7727465312 +18 53 03.549393384   8.21 7.63     F9V 1046 1
24 BD+37 4734B PM* 22 57 46.8442481880 +38 40 30.358351704   10.82 9.87     G0V 150 1
25 WASP-6 * 23 12 37.7368282608 -22 40 26.273805024   12.90 11.91     G8V 80 1
26 WASP-4 PM* 23 34 15.0857248317 -42 03 41.047972591   13.51 12.48 11.9   G7V 149 1
27 WASP-5 V* 23 57 23.7564672192 -41 16 37.743700800   12.808 12.146 12.058 11.44 G4V 104 1
28 CD-35 16019 PM* 23 59 36.0711872328 -35 01 52.923618408   10.49 9.87 9.91   G6 94 0

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2022.07.06-09:29:34

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